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  • strict warning: Non-static method Pagination::getInstance() should not be called statically in /home/buildingsurplus/public_html/sites/all/modules/pagination/pagination.module on line 344.
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DO IT YOURSELF

Repairing Drywall 2011/08/05

It’s a fairly easy thing to damage or crack drywall. There are so many elements that could cause damage: accidentally denting it while rearranging furniture, collateral damage from other home improvement projects, your house’s shifting and settling and so on. Improper installation can also lead to damage later on. If the drywall isn’t flush against the joists and studs when it’s installed, there’s a good chance that the nails will start to push through the outermost layer of the drywall’s surface later on down the road. Even moisture changes in the wood can cause the drywall to shrink or expand, which can also lead to damage. Luckily, repairing these ailments is not a major home improvement undertaking.

Cracks: Use a utility knife with a new blade (or at least a blade in very good condition; a dull blade will do more harm than good) to cut a V-shaped groove on either side of the crack. This should cause the cracked drywall to simply be replaced by the groove. Next you’ll need to fill the groove with easy-sand setting compound. Let it dry and then touch it up with a piece of sandpaper. Apply joint compound to the freshly sanded area and lay joint paper into the compound, flattening it. Once it’s dried, add another coat of the compound so that it’s covering the tape. Smooth it so that it blends with the wall and there are no visible edges. Let dry, prime and paint.

Nails: You have an option for a fast and temporary fix as well as a permanent fix. Temporary fix is to simply reset the nail firmly and then cover it back up with spackle. For a more permanent solution, remove the popped nail with a flat pry bar, being careful not to put too much pressure onto the drywall to damage it further. Next, put in a wall screw above or below the nail hole. Fill the area with joint compound, let dry, repeat and then sand smooth. Prime and refinish as needed.

Holes: Measure and cut a square around the hole, removing the damaged piece of drywall so that a square hole remains. If the hole is by a stud, cut the drywall back to the center of the stud. Next, put backer boards into the whole, securing them with drywall screws. Cut out a square patch of drywall from a fresh sheet to fill the hole, being sure to allow a small amount of space around the edges. Attach to backer board with wall screws. Finish by applying self-sticking fiberglass mesh tape to the seams, adding 2-3 coats of joint compound over the entire area. Smooth it out so it blends with the wall, let dry, sand it down, prime it and paint.

Corners: Remove any joint compound that’s come loose from the area using just your fingers, and then grab a mill file to get rid of any sharp or abrupt edges. Mix a setting compound and fill in any damaged areas. Smooth it out evenly and allow it to dry, reapplying compound as required. Once it looks even, sand it with a piece of sandpaper, prime it and finish with paint.

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